LYNETTE ST. CLAIR

Shoshone linguist, cultural preservationist & education consultant on the Wind River Reservation

Lynette believes fiercely in preserving the Shoshone language and culture, as well as representing an authentic indigenous voice in her involvement with statewide standards initiatives to redefine the contributions of American Indians throughout the state.

Lynette believes fiercely in preserving the Shoshone language and culture, as well as representing an authentic indigenous voice in her involvement with statewide standards initiatives to redefine the contributions of American Indians throughout the state.

 
Dumu newe’ daygwup gay ah soowahzee.”
”Never forget our language.
— Lynette St. Clair
 
Lynette is a linguist, cultural preservationist, former educator, education consultant and program director in Ft. Washakie on the Wind River Reservation.

Lynette is a linguist, cultural preservationist, former educator, education consultant and program director in Ft. Washakie on the Wind River Reservation.

 
 

Listen to Lynette's story.

 

Lynette St. Clair grew up in Ft. Washakie, Wyoming on the Wind River Reservation. A linguist, cultural preservationist, former educator and education consultant, Lynette is passionate about preserving and sharing the Shoshone language with the next generation and with the world. Lynette was awarded the National Johnson O'Malley Teacher of the Year distinction in 2015 for her implementation of technology to enhance language instruction to the children of the Wind River Reservation. She's been involved with statewide standards initiatives to address how the contributions of American Indians are taught in Wyoming classrooms, representing an authentic voice for indigenous people in the re-writing of history. Lynette's cultural projects include Shoshone Bingo, Art for the Sky, HOPA Mountain Cultural Exchange and Five Buffalo Days.

During our interview, Lynette and I talk about her journey to becoming an educator and program consultant, as well as her mission to preserve and implement Shoshone language and culture as a means to instill pride and sense of self within the next generation on the Wind River Reservation.

 
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Formerly an educator, Lynette believes in preserving and sharing the Shoshone language and culture to instill pride within the next generation on the Wind River Reservation.

Formerly an educator, Lynette believes in preserving and sharing the Shoshone language and culture to instill pride within the next generation on the Wind River Reservation.

 
 
Our language is who we are. It’s in our DNA. It’s synonymous with our very existence.
— Lynette St. Clair
 
 
Lynette St. Clair on her homeland -- the Wind River Reservation.

Lynette St. Clair on her homeland -- the Wind River Reservation.

 
 
We still have all of our traditional beliefs, but we are going forward. We’re not just relics of the past. We are contemporary. We are here, we are living, breathing, human beings just like everybody else, and we have a lot to offer to the world.
— Lynette St. Clair
 
"Zahn seek dawvay." Meaning, "Today is a good day," in Shoshone.

"Zahn seek dawvay." Meaning, "Today is a good day," in Shoshone.


 

 

DR. DIANE NOTON

Emergency Room Physician & Rural Doctor

Dr. Diane Noton has dedicated her life to serving small towns in Wyoming.

Dr. Diane Noton has dedicated her life to serving small towns in Wyoming.

 
A healthy community is a happy community, and I wanted to move back to Wyoming to make my community healthy so it could be happy.
— Dr. Diane Noton
 
Dr. Diane operated a family medicine clinic in Saratoga and later in Meeteetse, Wyoming; she was the only practicing physician within a 30+ mile radius.

Dr. Diane operated a family medicine clinic in Saratoga and later in Meeteetse, Wyoming; she was the only practicing physician within a 30+ mile radius.

 
 

Listen to Dr. Diane's story.

 

Dr. Diane Noton has dedicated her life to serving small towns in Wyoming. First, as a family medicine physician in Saratoga, Wyoming and later in Meeteestse, Wyoming. In both areas, she was the only practicing physician within a 30-mile radius. While in Saratoga, Dr. Diane ran the medical clinic, as well as the nursing home and ambulance service. Later, she opened the Meeteetse clinic to provide medical service locally. Most recently, Dr. Diane has shifted gears to practicing emergency room medicine in Worland, Wyoming. After years in private practice, she discovered the intensity, pace and structured schedule of emergency room medicine fits her best now, while maintaining her devotion to practicing medicine in rural Wyoming.

During our interview, Dr. Diane and I talk about when she knew she wanted to become a doctor, realizing her dream to serve small towns in Wyoming, and her personal journey to find more balance between work and life. 

 
Dr. Diane fulfilled her childhood dream of becoming a doctor and serving small towns in Wyoming, first as a family medicine practitioner in Saratoga, later Meeteetse, Wyoming, and now as an emergency room physician in Worland, Wyoming.

Dr. Diane fulfilled her childhood dream of becoming a doctor and serving small towns in Wyoming, first as a family medicine practitioner in Saratoga, later Meeteetse, Wyoming, and now as an emergency room physician in Worland, Wyoming.

 
 
I wanted to go there because no one was there. I like to be the person who does things when no one else is available. I’ll fill that spot.
— Dr. Diane Noton
 
 
Dr. Diane found balance working in emergency room medicine, which involves long, intense hours and a structured time frame.

Dr. Diane found balance working in emergency room medicine, which involves long, intense hours and a structured time frame.

 
 
Anything can come in at any given moment. There’s a buzzer that rings. You get that surge, deep in your gut. I really love the intensity of it, and how there’s a resolution to your encounter with your patient.
— Dr. Diane Noton on emergency room medicine
 
Dr. Diane outside of the emergency room in Worland, Wyoming.

Dr. Diane outside of the emergency room in Worland, Wyoming.


 

 

REV. BERNADINE CRAFT

Episcopal priest, former state senator and community advocate in Rock Springs, Wyoming

Former Wyoming representative, Episcopal priest and community steward, Bernadine Craft.

Former Wyoming representative, Episcopal priest and community steward, Bernadine Craft.

 
Instead of saying I can’t do this because ... I think what you have to do is say I can do this, I just have to figure out how.
— Rev. Bernadine Craft
 
Bernadine Craft has dedicated her life to serving the Rock Springs community in her multiple roles as a psychotherapist, former state representative, Executive Director of Sweetwater BOCES and currently, as the priest of Holy Communion Episcopoal Church.

Bernadine Craft has dedicated her life to serving the Rock Springs community in her multiple roles as a psychotherapist, former state representative, Executive Director of Sweetwater BOCES and currently, as the priest of Holy Communion Episcopoal Church.

 
 

Listen to Bernadine's story.

 

Rev. Bernadine Craft is an Episcopal priest, former state representative, psychotherapist, and the Executive Director of Sweetwater BOCES in her hometown of Rock Springs, Wyoming. In her multiple community service roles, Bernadine's primary concern is being a voice for the voiceless. As a state senator and representative, having served in both Wyoming's House and Senate, Bernadine pushed forward legislation concerned with human services issues, including domestic violence, animal abuse, and advocating for the rights of children, the elderly and disabled. As a priest, Bernadine's faith belief is open, inclusive and pledges to respect the dignity and worth of every human being.

During our interview, Bernadine and I talk about her journey home to Rock Springs, the importance of being open to change and life's possibilities, and her passion for representing underserved voices in her community and across the state.

 
Bernadine has dedicated her life to serving her hometown and community in Rock Springs, Wyoming.

Bernadine has dedicated her life to serving her hometown and community in Rock Springs, Wyoming.

 
 
I tried to be the voice for the people who have no voice. A lot of groups in Wyoming are well-funded, which means they are heard. The people and the legislation I tended to sponsor were for those who can’t afford the big lobbyists. Someone has to speak for them, and I was going to be that voice.
— Rev. Bernadine Craft on serving in Wyoming's House & Senate
 
 
Bernadine is the priest of Holy Communion Episcopal Church, one of her multiple service roles in Rock Springs, Wyoming.

Bernadine is the priest of Holy Communion Episcopal Church, one of her multiple service roles in Rock Springs, Wyoming.

 
 
You have to listen, and you have to be open to change, and you have to understand that the course you plotted might not be the one you end up taking.
— Rev. Bernadine Craft
 
"Bloom where you are planted," says Bernadine about fulfilling your potential. In other words, whether you're living in a small town in Wyoming or a city, make the most of where you are and how you can apply yourself.

"Bloom where you are planted," says Bernadine about fulfilling your potential. In other words, whether you're living in a small town in Wyoming or a city, make the most of where you are and how you can apply yourself.

 

 

 

LORI OLSON

Director of the Upton Municipal Airport, backcountry pilot & rural airstrip advocate

Lori Olson is a backcountry pilot, rural airstrip advocate, and director of the Upton Municipal Airport in Upton, Wyoming. Pictured here with 'Papa Charlie,' her American Champion 7GCGC high country plane.

Lori Olson is a backcountry pilot, rural airstrip advocate, and director of the Upton Municipal Airport in Upton, Wyoming. Pictured here with 'Papa Charlie,' her American Champion 7GCGC high country plane.

 
I don’t care if it’s 10 degrees out. If I’m in my plane, I’m where I need to be.
— Lori Olson
 
Lori Olson pursued her dream to fly later in life. She saved her town airstrip from being turned into a dump, and now leads a statewide task-force to preserve other small, rural landing strips around the state.

Lori Olson pursued her dream to fly later in life. She saved her town airstrip from being turned into a dump, and now leads a statewide task-force to preserve other small, rural landing strips around the state.

 
 

Listen to Lori's story.

 

Backcountry pilot and rural airstrip advocate, Lori Olson, came from a flying family in Upton, Wyoming. Her family's primary mode of transportation was by plane to commute across the vast stretches of Wyoming and the region. As a kid however, Lori was afraid to fly. It wasn't until she moved back to Upton with her husband and twin daughters later in life that the urge to fly became so strong she couldn't ignore it. She took a discovery course flight and was hooked. In the five short years that Lori has pursued her dream to fly, she's become the director of the Upton Municipal airport, saved the Upton airport from becoming a dump, and leads a statewide task force to save rural airstrips around the state. Lori prefers to land in the backcountry versus on pavement. Her next big goal is to become a Certified Flight Instructor and share her love of flying with aspiring pilots. 

During our interview, Lori and I talk about her dream to fly and how her world has changed from following her heart and pursuing her aviation dreams.

 
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Lori Olson and Papa Charlie, ready for take-off.

Lori Olson and Papa Charlie, ready for take-off.

 
 
If there’s something that you want to do, try it! That doesn’t mean you’re going to succeed at everything, but you won’t know until you try.
— Lori Olson
 
 
Lori Olson with her twin daughters, who were one of her biggest motivators for Lori to pursue her dream to fly.

Lori Olson with her twin daughters, who were one of her biggest motivators for Lori to pursue her dream to fly.

 
 
At what point do you say, ‘My life is over?’ Hopefully never! Keep going out there and finding things that are fulfilling to you and give you joy. The greatest joy, and flying has done that for me.
— Lori Olson
 
Pursuing her dream to fly has opened up the world for Lori to explore new opportunities and experiences.

Pursuing her dream to fly has opened up the world for Lori to explore new opportunities and experiences.


 

 

MEGAN GRASSELL

Founder & CEO of Yellowberry

Megan Grassell is the founder and CEO of Yellowberry- a bra, underwear, lounge and activewear company for girls ages 8-14. Megan grew up on a ranch in Pinedale, Wyoming and later in Jackson as a competitive ski racer. She founded Yellowberry when she was 17 years old as a junior in high school, and is revolutionizing the bra industry for young girls from Wyoming.

Megan Grassell is the founder and CEO of Yellowberry- a bra, underwear, lounge and activewear company for girls ages 8-14. Megan grew up on a ranch in Pinedale, Wyoming and later in Jackson as a competitive ski racer. She founded Yellowberry when she was 17 years old as a junior in high school, and is revolutionizing the bra industry for young girls from Wyoming.

 
When you grow up in a place where there are no rules, there are also no boundaries. You have all this freedom, so you’re building something all the time. I think Wyoming is a feeding ground for the characteristics that it takes to build an entreprenuer.
— Megan Grassell
 
 
 

Listen to Megan's story.

 

Megan Grassell is a teen founder and the CEO of Yellowberry- a bra, underwear, activewear and loungewear company for girls ages 8-14. Megan grew up in Pinedale, Wyoming and later in Jackson as a competitive ski racer. She founded Yellowberry when she was 17 years old after discovering the only option for her younger sister's first bra was a leopard print push-up or a sports bra. Determined to create a non-sexualized, stylish first bra option for young girls, while supporting young girls to own their ambition and ideas, Megan launched Yellowberry to national acclaim. Now in her 20s, Megan's revolutionizing the bra industry for young girls from Wyoming. She's partnered with American Eagle, has been featured on Good Morning America and the Today Show, and been named to Time's 25 Most Influential Teens, Yahoo's 24 Millennials to Watch and Forbes 30 Under 30 lists.

During our interview, Megan and I talk about how growing up in Wyoming influenced her entrepreneurial journey, her mission to become the brand that girls grow up with, and her passion to help other girls realize their ambition and own their unique strengths and talents.

 
Starting her company at 17 years old, Megan was not always taken seriously as a teen founder and CEO. Now at 22, she's learned to own her vision and role as CEO, leading her company to become a nationally recognized brand. Megan's been featured on The Today Show and named to Time's 25 Most Influential Teens and Forbes 30 Under 30 lists for her products and mission to support young girls as they grow up.

Starting her company at 17 years old, Megan was not always taken seriously as a teen founder and CEO. Now at 22, she's learned to own her vision and role as CEO, leading her company to become a nationally recognized brand. Megan's been featured on The Today Show and named to Time's 25 Most Influential Teens and Forbes 30 Under 30 lists for her products and mission to support young girls as they grow up.

 
 
Girls have really big ideas that should be taken seriously.
— Megan Grassell
 
 
Yellowberry's mission is to be the brand that girls grow up with, and support young girls to own their ambition and ideas.

Yellowberry's mission is to be the brand that girls grow up with, and support young girls to own their ambition and ideas.

 
 
Being smart, working really hard, being ambitious and going after what you want is awesome, and more girls should feel comfortable doing those types of things.
— Megan Grassell, CEO/Founder of Yellowberry
 
 
Megan's largest vision for her company is to build Yellowberry into a household, nationally recognized brand as the brand girls grow up with. She recently got picked up by a very well-known, nationwide retailer; Yellowberry will be in stores across the country in the near future.

Megan's largest vision for her company is to build Yellowberry into a household, nationally recognized brand as the brand girls grow up with. She recently got picked up by a very well-known, nationwide retailer; Yellowberry will be in stores across the country in the near future.